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TREK: 2008 Beijing: The Urban Condition

China is the most rapidly developing nation on Earth. Beijing strives to become one of the most progressive cities in the world and lead its country by example. Most of urban China has become a place where people have the opportunity to live in comfort, and the major centers attract the most talented professionals providing a complex web of inspiration to all who visit. The city already has some impressive architectural endeavors in progress with the immense development of Beijing’s Central Business District (CBD), the advancement of its public transit system and airport expansion, and the remarkable preparations for the summer Olympics in 2008.

With approximately 12 million inhabitants, and the projected GTA in ten years of 60 million, it is easy to see why the Beijing Municipal Government has placed a priority on reducing pollution and increasing environmental awareness. As Beijing moves forward with construction for the 2008 Summer Olympics, they have adopted the term “Green Olympics.”
They have planned to conserve water, protect sensitive ecosystems, and implement state-of-the-art sustainable energy technologies. Beijing hopes to create the greatest environmental legacy ever for the Olympic Games. The games will come and go, but what will they leave behind? I will focus on how the Olympic venues are reaching the lofty goal of giving full consideration to both the Olympic competitions and post-games uses. I will study the planned masterpieces of sports facilities that have integrated the concepts of modern construction technologies, environmental protection and architectural art that are evolving at an unprecedented pace. Personal photos, videos and ‘artifacts’ speak to people more than textbooks, websites and seminars. Therefore, I see it as a privilege to bring this culture, this event, and this experience to our offices, so that the four walls surrounding us can themselves resonate with the excitement currently taking place in Beijing. I am confident that visiting Beijing to document the urban explosion of “Green” architecture and design will create an infectious epidemic of inspiration.